Veterinary Clinic

  • aloes in the eastern cape at humansdorp vet.jpg
  • beautiful humansdorp vet sunset at krom river.jpg
  • humansdorp vet cocks comb landscape.jpg
  • owl in natural environment at humansdorp vet .jpg
  • the cocks comb landscape at humansdorp vet.jpg

Contact Us

042 295 1083
071 180 3639

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

Westgate
Humansdorp
6300 

 

Directions to Humansdorp Veterinary Clinic

 

PO Box 151
Humansdorp
6300 

Business Hours

Monday - Friday 08:00 - 17:00

Saturday 08:00 - 11:30

 

A veterinarian is on call for emergencies out of the above hours.  His/her cell number will be available on the practice telephone answering machine (042 295 1083) and the practice cellular phone (071 180 3639).

Pet Tips

 

All | Breeding | Dental | Diet | Disease | Emergency | Eye | General | Heart | Illness | Joints | Lifestyle | Skin | Symptoms | Worms

Gastric dilatation volvulus

My dogs abdomen is distended and he's acting very restless

It’s a scary situation when your dog looks like he has a bloated tummy, but he’s really experiencing a life-threatening medical emergency. Gastric dilatation volvulus or GDV is also called bloat, but it’s more than just a bit of air in the stomach. Its other name – gastric torsion – describes how, once inflated with air, the stomach can also twist around itself and cut off blood supply to other major organs. The body then goes into shock and the condition becomes life-threatening.



Heart diseases in cats

My cat seems to have breathing difficulty and is lethargic

The American Veterinary Medical Association suggests that one in 10 cats across the globe is either born with or develops some form of heart disease in their lifetime. There are a number of different types of heart disease in felines, but all of them present with some kind of abnormal structure or function of the heart’s chambers, valves or surrounding muscle.



Urolithiasis

My pet has begun to pee a lot more frequently, but in smaller amounts. Even though she's house-trained, she still pees in the house and sometimes there is blood in her urine.

What is urolithiasis?

Urolithiasis is the long-winded Latin term to describe the development of bladder and kidney stones. The term ‘uro’ describes the urinary system, while ‘lith’ means stone.



Eclampsia in pets

My dog/cat recently had puppies/kittens and is starting to show strange twitches and spasms

What is eclampsia?

Eclampsia is a life-threatening condition in dogs and cats that have recently had a litter of puppies or kittens. It has been seen in pets that are pregnant or giving birth, but more commonly occurs one to four weeks after giving birth. It is a medical emergency caused by a sudden drop in blood calcium levels, usually due to calcium loss during pregnancy and nursing.



Coughing

My pet seems to have a persistent cough. What caused it and what can I do about it?

Coughing is one of the most common syndromes veterinarians all around the world encounter during consultations. Coughing in itself is not a disease, but a symptom of something else in your pet. The onset, type of cough, duration and production will help the vet to get to the bottom of what’s going on inside your pet.

What is coughing?

Coughing is an audible, forceful expelling of air from the lungs usually in an attempt to clear the airways. Forceful expulsion of air should follow forceful inhalation for the whole action to qualify as a cough. A cough is actually a protective reflex of the body, which signals the presence of an underlying condition. Coughing is generally classified into two main categories namely a wet/productive cough or a dry/non-productive cough. A wet cough is one in which there is an accompanying fluid or mucous discharge seen with each episode; while a dry cough has no discharge or fluid.  



Is my dog ill?

Common signs of illness in dogs

Thanks to the nationwide lockdown, we’ll all be spending the next three weeks in the constant company of our furry friends. As the days go by, you may notice some behaviours or signs in your dog that you haven’t noticed before and may wonder if these are cause for concern. This article will outline the most common signs of illness that you may notice in your dog.



Is my cat ill?

Common signs of illness in cats

Thanks to the nationwide lockdown, we’ll all be spending the next three weeks in the constant company of our furry friends. As the days go by you may start noticing some behaviours or signs in your cat that you haven’t noticed before and may wonder if these are cause for concern. This article will outline the most common signs of illness that you may notice in your cat.



My cat is eating like crazy and not picking up weight

Hyperthyroidism in cats

What is hyperthyroidism?

Hyperthyroidism is a condition that arises from an excessive production and secretion of active thyroid hormones by an abnormally functioning thyroid gland. First recognised in the late 1970’s, the frequency of diagnosis has escalated dramatically - currently it is the most common endocrine (hormone system) disease in cats and also one of the more frequently diagnosed disorders in the veterinary field. The condition is estimated to affect 1 in 300 cats.



My cat has suddenly gone lame in her hindquarters and seems to be in a lot of pain

Feline Aortic Thromboembolism

What is Feline Aortic Thromboembolism?

Feline Aortic Thromboembolism (ATE) is a condition in cats where a big blood clot settles and blocks the main artery (the aorta) running from the heart to the cat’s hind legs.  The clot typically settles near the pelvis, where the aorta divides into the two main arteries that extend into the legs.



My pet is vomiting

Is vomiting a sign of an upset tummy?

Vomiting is one of the most common symptoms of disease seen in pets. It can be quite alarming to see your pet vomit up all his or her food or alternatively continuously wretch and only bring slime or bile. So should you rush your dog or cat to the vet immediately when you see them vomit, or is it safe to wait and see? Because there are so many causes of vomiting, we recommend that if you are ever in doubt, it is always better to visit the vet and have it seen to, even if it is just to put your mind at ease and prevent it from progressing to something more serious.



1 2 3 4